8. Comparing the Proportion of Antibiotic Producing Soil Bacteria Isolated from the Shores of Lake Mendota and Lake Michigan

Comparing the Proportion of Antibiotic Producing Soil Bacteria Isolated from the Shores of Lake Mendota and Lake Michigan

Stephanie Frisch, Thomas Montana, Isaac Otte, Sarah Worley
University of Wisconsin – Madison

In the modern day, we are fighting a shortage of effective antibiotics as diseases evolve resistance against these treatments. Discovering new antibiotic-producing microbes from the soil addresses this health threat found in modern hospitals. This paper examined the soil environment in which soil bacteria grow, specifically at the soil near Lake Mendota and Lake Michigan. It includes research comparing the soil microbe’s antibiotic production of soil near both lakes. Four soil samples from both lakes were collected and tested for antibiotic-producing bacteria. Quantitative observations of antibiotic production from soil samples were used as comparisons between the two lakes. The results of this research concluded that there was no statistical difference between antibiotic production in soil found near Lake Mendota and Lake Michigan. One explanation for these results could be seasonal turnover which can lead to changes in environmental factors affecting secondary metabolites produced by microbes in the soil.